Radial Artery Catheterization

Cardiac catheterization (cath) typically involves inserting a small tube or  sheath into a major artery (most commonly the femoral artery in the groin) and  snaking a small catheter to the heart.  Contrast dye is injected through the catheter  generating motion picture images of blood flow through the heart (coronary)  arteries and chambers.  Angioplasty and stenting, commonly referred to as “PCI,”  can then be performed as necessary through the catheter.  For procedures  performed via femoral access, patients are usually prescribed 2‐8 hours of complete  bed‐rest after the procedure along with various manual or mechanical compression  techniques or artificial closure devices (“plugs”) to promote healing of the area and  reduce bleeding.  Commonly patients experience pain and discomfort at the femoral  access site for several days or weeks after the procedure even in the absence of  complications.  Major complications of this approach include severe bleeding  requiring transfusion or even surgery to repair the femoral artery.    An alternative access site for cardiac cath is the radial artery that runs on the  right side of the wrist.  Numerous clinical trials and studies have demonstrated  excellent outcomes and increased patient comfort of cardiac cath and PCI via the  radial artery.  These studies have also demonstrated a reduction in major  complications including a 70% reduction in bleeding.  Further there is no need for  complete bed rest, manual compression, or artificial closure devices after the  procedure.  Patients are often able to be discharged from the hospital and return to  completely normal activities much sooner than with femoral catheterization.    Drs. Patel and Slota are the first in the region to offer radial artery cardiac  cath and PCI in any patient with intact arterial circulation to the wrist and hand.   This is in contrast to many institutions where it is only offered to carefully selected  patients.   If you have any questions regarding cardiac cath and the radial approach  please do not hesitate to contact us.  Below are some relevant links to the radial  approach for cardiac cath, a detailed video of the procedure and photographs of one  of our patients undergoing the procedure.

Radial Artery Catheterization">